Third body found after Norway landslide


Flash floods and ponding in Singapore
Singapore tightens rules for maritime…
Aniston and Theroux may have separated 3…
Couples workout: exercise together to…
SolarWinds hack may be much worse than…
Deutsche Bank should play leading role in…
India holds vaccine drills ahead of mass…
Burger King Brazil Reimagined 2020 As…
Green, Red or Black – Roman Bürki’s Je…
MG Hector Plus seven-seat variant spotted…
My travel dream for 2021: top 12 readers’…
As Chinese tourists steer clear of Indone…
HSR terminated after no agreement is…
‘Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D’ actress Chloe Bennet…
The Blade, Tsui Hark’s nihilistic 1995 wuxia…
India approves AstraZeneca and local…
The Milky Way is probably full of dead…
The Binding of Isaac: Repentance gets a PC…
Electricity prices set to fall in S’pore over Q1…
If You’re Doing Dry January, Here A…
Inter Milan vs Crotone: Match Preview
Private aviation thrived in 2020 despite it…
The consequences of Singapore’s snitching…
SG: Woman convicted of keeping $17,000…
James Corden Says ‘I’m Fed Up with the Way I…
Asia Today: Australian states reimpose travel…
“Keep your heads up for 2021” teases…
Singapore Sees Uneven Recovery in 2021…
A Week In San Diego, CA, On $23 An Hour
How Ben Affleck became an accidental…
2010 Ford Focus SE Stars in Inspired DIY…
10 good news stories for UK travel and…
Post A Pic Of: Vulcan Post’s Top 15…
COVID-19 safety measures: 2 groups…
Nicki Minaj Reveals She Almost Named Her…
Baguettes, rye bread, pastries, honey cake –…
US legislators’ homes vandalised after…
On This Day in Space! Jan. 2, 2004: Stardust…
The Worst Games Of 2020 According To…
Some Asia-Pacific markets soared ove…
When My Friend Temporarily Moved In…
The 5 Pillars of Santa Maria-Style BBQ With…
The Chelsea lineup that should start against…
Flash floods and ponding in Singapore and JB over the new year’s weekend
Singapore tightens rules for maritime sector after COVID cases
Rescue workers have recovered a third body and continue searching for another seven people still missing four days after a landslide buried homes in a Norwegian village.
“We still have hope of finding survivors,” rescue operations chief Roy Alkvist told reporters on Saturday.
A whole hillside collapsed in the village of Ask, 25km (15 miles) northeast of the capital Oslo, in the early hours of Wednesday morning, injuring 10 people, one of them seriously.
Homes were buried under mud, others cut in two and some houses left teetering over a crater caused by the mudslide, with several subsequently falling over the edge.
The landslide destroyed several houses and shifted others hundreds of metres.
Earlier on Saturday, local police chief Ida Melbo Oystese said authorities hoped some people might have survived thanks to pockets of air inside partially intact buildings.
By late Saturday, a second and third body had been found after a first one was discovered on Friday. Only a Dalmatian dog has been rescued alive from the ruins so far.
No details have been released about the identities of the bodies.
But the police have released a list of the names of 10 missing people: eight adults, a two-year-old and a 13-year-old child.
Police have also said 10 people were injured, including one seriously who was transferred to Oslo for treatment shortly after the disaster.
Spokeswoman Toril Hofshagen from the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) called the landslide unique in its destruction.
“Not since 1893 has there been a quick clay landslide of this dimension in Norway,” Hofshagen told Norwegian media.
More than 1,000 people have been evacuated, and officials said up to 1,500 people may be moved from the area amid fears of further landslides.
“We are at a hotel,” two of the evacuees, Olav Gjerdingen and Sissel Meyer Gjerdingen, told AFP news agency. “It is a completely surreal and terrible situation.”
The NVE said the disaster was a “quick clay slide” of approximately 300 by 800 metres.
Quick clay is a sort of clay found in Norway and Sweden that can collapse and turn to fluid when overstressed.
The authorities have banned all aircraft from the disaster area until 3pm (14:00 GMT) on Monday as they conduct aerial searches.
Norwegian rescue workers are being helped by their counterparts from Sweden.
Visiting the site last week, Prime Minister Erna Solberg described it as one of the biggest landslides the country had ever experienced.

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.